Art of Swords

Sword
/sôrd/
Noun
1. A weapon consisting typically of a long, straight or slightly curved, pointed blade having one or two cutting edges and set into a hilt.
2. An instrument of death or destruction.

The Sword of Tutankhamen
Created: 1333 BC - 1323 BC
Culture: Pharaonic
Technique: Metal Techniques
Cast Style: New Kingdom
Medium: Bronze
Tribute post: November 26th, 1922 archaeologist Howard Carter opened Tutankhamen’s tomb in the Valley of the Kings, Egypt - thus I’m going to feature a special weapon today, the sword of Tutankhamen.
"King Tut" or Tutankhamen (alternately spelled with Tutenkh-, -amen, -amon), lived approx. 1341 BC – 1323 BC, was an Egyptian pharaoh of the 18th dynasty (ruled ca. 1332 BC – 1323 BC in the conventional chronology), during the period of Egyptian history known as the New Kingdom. His original name, Tutankhaten, means "Living Image of Aten", while Tutankhamen means "Living Image of Amun".
The sword of King Tutankhamen was an Egyptian Khopesh, the common sword used in Ancient Egypt times and was made by a single piece of bronze divided into three parts. The first part is the hilt, which is black. The second and third parts form the blade. 
The second part is straight, on the same level as the handle, and is engraved with the figure of a lotus flower with a long stem. The third part is bent to form a curve, and is engraved with a long stripe. 
The shape of this sword is the same as the sword held by the figure of the king, depicted on the perforated and gilded wood votive shield that was found in the tomb, and is considered to be ceremonial in purpose.

Sources: Wikipedia | Eternal Egypt

The Sword of Tutankhamen

  • Created: 1333 BC - 1323 BC
  • Culture: Pharaonic
  • Technique: Metal Techniques
  • Cast Style: New Kingdom
  • Medium: Bronze

Tribute post: November 26th, 1922 archaeologist Howard Carter opened Tutankhamen’s tomb in the Valley of the Kings, Egypt - thus I’m going to feature a special weapon today, the sword of Tutankhamen.

"King Tut" or Tutankhamen (alternately spelled with Tutenkh-, -amen, -amon), lived approx. 1341 BC – 1323 BC, was an Egyptian pharaoh of the 18th dynasty (ruled ca. 1332 BC – 1323 BC in the conventional chronology), during the period of Egyptian history known as the New Kingdom. His original name, Tutankhaten, means "Living Image of Aten", while Tutankhamen means "Living Image of Amun".

The sword of King Tutankhamen was an Egyptian Khopesh, the common sword used in Ancient Egypt times and was made by a single piece of bronze divided into three parts. The first part is the hilt, which is black. The second and third parts form the blade. 

The second part is straight, on the same level as the handle, and is engraved with the figure of a lotus flower with a long stem. The third part is bent to form a curve, and is engraved with a long stripe. 

The shape of this sword is the same as the sword held by the figure of the king, depicted on the perforated and gilded wood votive shield that was found in the tomb, and is considered to be ceremonial in purpose.

Sources: Wikipedia | Eternal Egypt

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    I want a khopesh.
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