Art of Swords

Sword
/sôrd/
Noun
1. A weapon consisting typically of a long, straight or slightly curved, pointed blade having one or two cutting edges and set into a hilt.
2. An instrument of death or destruction.

Sword with scabbard
Culture: Ottoman
Dated: mid 16th Century
Medium: blade iron and gold, vessel covered with leather cross, pommel cap and iron fittings, wooden scabbard covered with leather, iron fittings.
Measurements: total length 100.8 cm, blade 87.2cm, weight 986g
This impressive sword came as a gift from Heinrich von Bünau (statesman and historian from the Kingdom of Saxony) into possession of Elector August of Saxony. Heinrich was Bünau Electoral Council, captain of Colditz and Obersteuereinnehmer. In 1574 he stayed with the imperial legation headed by David Ungnad in Istanbul.
According to the inventory Henry of Bünau brought this sword from Istanbul to Dresden. The blade of this weapon is decorated in rich gold inlay on the front. The decor consists of floral scrolls and diagonal stripes, alternately filled with Rumi (real name - Jalal ad-Din Muhammad Balkhi) was a 13th-century Persian, Muslim poet, jurist, theologian, and Sufi mystic) verses and a Persian inscription.
Sidenotes 
The information contained in the inscription of the name come from Persian mythology. Faridun was the sixth mythical king and is described in the Book of Kings by Ferdowsi, the Shah-nama. He is regarded as a symbol of goodness and righteousness, of which also came from the Shah-nama is a Persian hero Rustam, who with the help of the miracle bird Simurgh saw the light of day.
Similar to Hercules from the Greek and Roman mythology was Rustam wearing a tiger skin and had to undergo numerous adventures and battles. He fought for the land of light, to Iran, to the land of darkness. Dschamschid (or Djam or Jamshid) was the fourth king of the Persian mythology.
During its 300-year reign, the kingdom experienced its first heyday. Among other things, he introduced the use of iron, by letting them produce helmets, chain mail and weapons. The day of his legendary coronation should mark the beginning of a new era and is still celebrated in Iran and the worldwide spread Baha’i day as the beginning of spring New Year (Nowruz/Naw Ruz).

Source & Copyright: Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden 

Sword with scabbard

  • Culture: Ottoman
  • Dated: mid 16th Century
  • Medium: blade iron and gold, vessel covered with leather cross, pommel cap and iron fittings, wooden scabbard covered with leather, iron fittings.
  • Measurements: total length 100.8 cm, blade 87.2cm, weight 986g

This impressive sword came as a gift from Heinrich von Bünau (statesman and historian from the Kingdom of Saxony) into possession of Elector August of Saxony. Heinrich was Bünau Electoral Council, captain of Colditz and Obersteuereinnehmer. In 1574 he stayed with the imperial legation headed by David Ungnad in Istanbul.

According to the inventory Henry of Bünau brought this sword from Istanbul to Dresden. The blade of this weapon is decorated in rich gold inlay on the front. The decor consists of floral scrolls and diagonal stripes, alternately filled with Rumi (real name - Jalal ad-Din Muhammad Balkhi) was a 13th-century Persian, Muslim poet, jurist, theologian, and Sufi mystic) verses and a Persian inscription.

  • Sidenotes 
  1. The information contained in the inscription of the name come from Persian mythology. Faridun was the sixth mythical king and is described in the Book of Kings by Ferdowsi, the Shah-nama. He is regarded as a symbol of goodness and righteousness, of which also came from the Shah-nama is a Persian hero Rustam, who with the help of the miracle bird Simurgh saw the light of day.
  2. Similar to Hercules from the Greek and Roman mythology was Rustam wearing a tiger skin and had to undergo numerous adventures and battles. He fought for the land of light, to Iran, to the land of darkness. Dschamschid (or Djam or Jamshid) was the fourth king of the Persian mythology.
  3. During its 300-year reign, the kingdom experienced its first heyday. Among other things, he introduced the use of iron, by letting them produce helmets, chain mail and weapons. The day of his legendary coronation should mark the beginning of a new era and is still celebrated in Iran and the worldwide spread Baha’i day as the beginning of spring New Year (Nowruz/Naw Ruz).

Source & Copyright: Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden 

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