Art of Swords

Sword
/sôrd/
Noun
1. A weapon consisting typically of a long, straight or slightly curved, pointed blade having one or two cutting edges and set into a hilt.
2. An instrument of death or destruction.

Kuku Macan - The “Tiger Claw” Dagger
This weapon is identified as a contemporary Kuku Macan from Sumatra, also called a “Tiger Claw” or a Kuku Ayam. The knife should not to be confused with the “Tiger’s Claw”, or Bagh Nakh, from India. The Kuku Ayam is a large version of a Lawi Ayam, both of which are cousins of the Malaysian Kerambit.   
So awed were the ancient Sunda people by the power and beauty of the Pak Macan (“pamacan”, “great tiger”), that this common blade of the people was patterned after the shape of the tiger’s claw. Kuku Macan translates as “tiger’s claw”. The smaller Lawi Ayam means “cock’s tail feather” or “spike chicken”. 
This weapon is held with the thumb over the hilt’s head, the blade pointing straight down and the tip towards the front.  When stabbing upwards (radak) it can cause atrocious injuries. The dagger is designed for an upward ripping movement into the bowels of the victim. The blade is strongly curved with the edge on the inside, but part of the back side is also sharp.  Small versions of this knife (e.g., Lawi Ayam) have been favored by women, who conceal them in their hair or the folds of a sarong.
Like the Kerambit, in ancient times the cutting edge of the Kuku Macan was almost always smeared with some type of deadly poison, which acted almost instantly upon entry into the bloodstream via laceration of the flesh. Even the smallest cut was enough to usher the poison into the bloodstream.
Knowledge and use of poisons derived from various species of poisonous frogs, snakes, scorpions and spiders were considered an essential element of a warrior’s arsenal of close-quarter combative skills. These poisons rapidly accelerated death and were mostly feared for their nearly instantaneous killing power.

Source & Copyright: Web Mac 

Kuku Macan - The “Tiger Claw” Dagger

This weapon is identified as a contemporary Kuku Macan from Sumatra, also called a “Tiger Claw” or a Kuku Ayam. The knife should not to be confused with the “Tiger’s Claw”, or Bagh Nakh, from India. The Kuku Ayam is a large version of a Lawi Ayam, both of which are cousins of the Malaysian Kerambit.   

So awed were the ancient Sunda people by the power and beauty of the Pak Macan (“pamacan”, “great tiger”), that this common blade of the people was patterned after the shape of the tiger’s claw. Kuku Macan translates as “tiger’s claw”. The smaller Lawi Ayam means “cock’s tail feather” or “spike chicken”. 

This weapon is held with the thumb over the hilt’s head, the blade pointing straight down and the tip towards the front.  When stabbing upwards (radak) it can cause atrocious injuries. The dagger is designed for an upward ripping movement into the bowels of the victim. The blade is strongly curved with the edge on the inside, but part of the back side is also sharp.  Small versions of this knife (e.g., Lawi Ayam) have been favored by women, who conceal them in their hair or the folds of a sarong.

Like the Kerambit, in ancient times the cutting edge of the Kuku Macan was almost always smeared with some type of deadly poison, which acted almost instantly upon entry into the bloodstream via laceration of the flesh. Even the smallest cut was enough to usher the poison into the bloodstream.

Knowledge and use of poisons derived from various species of poisonous frogs, snakes, scorpions and spiders were considered an essential element of a warrior’s arsenal of close-quarter combative skills. These poisons rapidly accelerated death and were mostly feared for their nearly instantaneous killing power.

Source & Copyright: Web Mac 

Hide notes

  1. kogiopsis reblogged this from art-of-swords
  2. scrub-niggurath reblogged this from shnjiros
  3. gasmaskchronicles reblogged this from art-of-swords
  4. kalidar reblogged this from instoration
  5. hanamiyass reblogged this from art-of-swords
  6. sixpencesoulcake reblogged this from art-of-swords
  7. thejokenobodygetsarchive reblogged this from art-of-swords
  8. hanuueshe reblogged this from art-of-swords
  9. lordookami reblogged this from art-of-swords
  10. keepwhatyoukill reblogged this from art-of-swords
  11. red-blade-jade reblogged this from tigersniper and added:
    You do know how I think. Can’t wait until it arrives. And you know I’ll enjoy it. Don’t think Akio will like it so much,...
  12. sophy-the-knives-kratides reblogged this from tigersniper and added:
    What can I say? I’ve always been a sucker for a good knife. I’ve got a hold on myself now, terribly sorry about that. I...
  13. mymphr reblogged this from tigersniper
  14. johnnypasserby reblogged this from tigersniper and added:
    Woah, weapon porn.
  15. vectoring reblogged this from art-of-swords
  16. ebonrune reblogged this from becomingamermaid
  17. truelifeofawrestler reblogged this from art-of-swords
  18. spectatorofwar reblogged this from art-of-swords
  19. teaspoon-of-salt reblogged this from art-of-swords
  20. laurentwoelectricboogaloo reblogged this from art-of-swords
  21. uke-xenomorph-chan-69 reblogged this from art-of-swords
  22. ghoulierobinson333 reblogged this from art-of-swords
  23. arrykau55 reblogged this from redrum-terror
  24. redrum-terror reblogged this from belphemonragemode
  25. flufflyneko reblogged this from art-of-swords
  26. bulletproof-and-dripping-in-gold reblogged this from analmouse
  27. specialability reblogged this from art-of-swords
  28. littledude-gal reblogged this from capriciouscannibal
  29. capriciouscannibal reblogged this from art-of-swords
  30. thefirstevergaydog reblogged this from crowhousescratch
  31. eddiescouch reblogged this from art-of-swords
  32. thisragingpeace reblogged this from art-of-swords
  33. catwhowalksthruwalls reblogged this from art-of-swords