Art of Swords

Sword
/sôrd/
Noun
1. A weapon consisting typically of a long, straight or slightly curved, pointed blade having one or two cutting edges and set into a hilt.
2. An instrument of death or destruction.

The Egyptian Sword - Khopesh
One of the most beautiful swords the human kind could create is the Khopesh (also vocalized khepesh). The cutting edge weapon is the Egyptian name of the Canaanite "sickle-sword", in Assyrian known as sappara. Its origins can be traced back to Sumer of the third millennium BCE (Before Common Era).
A typical khopesh is 50–60 cm (20 to 24 inches) in length, though smaller examples do also exist. This blade was designed for hooking an opponents shield or disarming them. These weapons changed from bronze to iron in the late period.
The blade is only sharpened on the outside portion of the curved end. The khopesh evolved from the epsilon or similar crescent shaped axes that were used in warfare. But unlike an axe, the khopesh does not make push-cuts, but rather slashes, like a sabre.
The khopesh went out of use around 1300 BCE. However, in the mysterious 196 BC Rosetta Stone it is referenced as the ‘sword’ determinative in a hieroglyphic block, with the spelled letters of kh, p, and sh to say: “Shall be set up a statue…, the Avenger of Baq-t-(Egypt), the interpretation whereof is ‘Ptolemy, the strong one of Kam-t’-(Egypt), and a statue of the god of the city, giving to him a sword royal of victory, …”
The Khopesh, and the sappara weapons are still sources of inspiration for designing fantasy weapons in video games or movies. Sappara and Khopesh swords are mainly use to arm the Elven forces, mostly because of their unique and graceful, yet deadly design.

The Egyptian Sword - Khopesh

One of the most beautiful swords the human kind could create is the Khopesh (also vocalized khepesh). The cutting edge weapon is the Egyptian name of the Canaanite "sickle-sword", in Assyrian known as sappara. Its origins can be traced back to Sumer of the third millennium BCE (Before Common Era).

A typical khopesh is 50–60 cm (20 to 24 inches) in length, though smaller examples do also exist. This blade was designed for hooking an opponents shield or disarming them. These weapons changed from bronze to iron in the late period.

The blade is only sharpened on the outside portion of the curved end. The khopesh evolved from the epsilon or similar crescent shaped axes that were used in warfare. But unlike an axe, the khopesh does not make push-cuts, but rather slashes, like a sabre.

The khopesh went out of use around 1300 BCE. However, in the mysterious 196 BC Rosetta Stone it is referenced as the ‘sword’ determinative in a hieroglyphic block, with the spelled letters of kh, p, and sh to say: “Shall be set up a statue…, the Avenger of Baq-t-(Egypt), the interpretation whereof is ‘Ptolemy, the strong one of Kam-t’-(Egypt), and a statue of the god of the city, giving to him a sword royal of victory, …”

The Khopesh, and the sappara weapons are still sources of inspiration for designing fantasy weapons in video games or movies. Sappara and Khopesh swords are mainly use to arm the Elven forces, mostly because of their unique and graceful, yet deadly design.

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    being a fan and amateur collector of weapons that involve practicing a physical art and do not require gunpowder, i have...
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