Art of Swords

Sword
/sôrd/
Noun
1. A weapon consisting typically of a long, straight or slightly curved, pointed blade having one or two cutting edges and set into a hilt.
2. An instrument of death or destruction.

English Rapier

  • Dated: 16th century
  • Measurements: overall lenght 48 1/2”; blade lenght 40” 

The blade features three grooves extending 12” from the hilt. The scalloped basket has perforations preceding a curled iron crossguard. The grip is comprised of intricately woven steel wire decorated with criss-crossing brass wire, while the large pommel is likewise decorated with a scallop design.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Alexander Historical Auctions

Piha-Kaetta Dagger

  • Dated: 18th century
  • Place of Origin: Sri Lanka
  • Medium: carved rhinosceros horn, gold, rubies and iron or steel, chased
  • Measurements: blade length: 5.7 cm

Source: Copyright © 2014 The Wallace Collection

[ REMINDER ] The “Real Fighting Stuff” Conference 2015
Date: 12th-13th March 2015
Location: Kelvingrove Museum, Glasgow, United Kingdom
Booking opened on the 7th of July 2014 and will close on the 13th of February 2015
[ The online booking form is available here ]
R.L. Scott’s magnificent collection of arms and armour, which he generously bequeathed to the people of Glasgow, comprises 890 pieces and a staggering 3000 books and manuscripts. The main aim that Scott intended for this collection was to "provide an instructive survey of the history of arms and armour to the people of Glasgow".
"The Real Fighting Stuff" Conference will take place in the same city Scott chose as the home for such extraordinary pieces as the "Avant" armour (c. 1440) and the only surviving copy of the earliest printed book with illustrations on swordsmanship (Vienna, 1516). 
The event will take place on Thursday the 12th and Friday the 13th of March 2015.
[ MAKE YOUR BOOKING TO ATTEND THIS CONFERENCE ]

Source: Copyright © 2014 Keith Farrell

[ REMINDER ] The “Real Fighting Stuff” Conference 2015

  • Date: 12th-13th March 2015
  • Location: Kelvingrove Museum, Glasgow, United Kingdom
  • Booking opened on the 7th of July 2014 and will close on the 13th of February 2015
  • The online booking form is available here ]

R.L. Scott’s magnificent collection of arms and armour, which he generously bequeathed to the people of Glasgow, comprises 890 pieces and a staggering 3000 books and manuscripts. The main aim that Scott intended for this collection was to "provide an instructive survey of the history of arms and armour to the people of Glasgow".

"The Real Fighting Stuff" Conference will take place in the same city Scott chose as the home for such extraordinary pieces as the "Avant" armour (c. 1440) and the only surviving copy of the earliest printed book with illustrations on swordsmanship (Vienna, 1516). 

The event will take place on Thursday the 12th and Friday the 13th of March 2015.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Keith Farrell

Silver mounted Sabre

  • Dated: first quarter of the 20th century
  • Place of Origin: Daghestan
  • Measurements: overall length 85.5 cm

The sword has a curved, single-edged blade grooved at the centre, engraved with woven bands at the edges. The silver hilt is decorated with nielloed floral motifs, while the “S”-shaped quillons is ending in the shape of lion head. The pommel is also shaped as a lion head, while the grip has a bone medallion richly pierced with floral motifs. The silver-plated wooden scabbard is decorated en suite.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Czerny’s International Auction House S.R.L.

Parade Partisan 

  • Dated: 18th century
  • Culture: German
  • Medium & Technique: blued, etched and gilded steel, wooden haft with original steel base spike, silk tassel with alternating blue and gold bands
  • Measurements: overall length 258.45 cm (101 3/4 inches); weight 3.68 kg
  • Inscriptions: AUGUST WILHELM/DG DUX BRUNS EA LUNEB [August Wilhelm, by the Grace of God Duke of Bunswich and Lüneburg]; 1718 HAW II [Herzog August Wilhelm]; PARTA TVERI [Defend your acquisitions]

The partisan was used by the Bodyguard of August Wilhelm, Duke of Brunswick - Wolfenbüttel [1662-1731].

Source: Copyright © 2014 Cleveland Museum of Art

Combination Lefauchaux Pinfire Revolver and Sword

  • Dated: circa 1800
  • Measurements: overall length 26 3/4 inches; blade length 18 1/2 inches; barrel length 3 1/2 inch round

Manufactured in Paris, France, this weapon combines a short bladed sword with a six-shot pepperbox revolver. The blade has a short double fullers leading to single fullers which run the rest of the length, panels of etched scrollwork on each side.

There also an etched scene of a deer in the woods on the left ricasso and the inscription “ALFREDO HEROUARD/LIMA”, which is the mark of a Portuguese agent and importer. The latter can be found on the right ahead of the revolver barrel.

The barrel runs along the right side of the blade, signed “E Lefauchaux a Paris” on top, with the serial number and a swiveling ejector rod on the front, a hinged loading gate at the rear, smooth hooked trigger and a checkered hammer.

The silver guard and pommel cap are engraved with scroll designs, and the grips are checkered ebony with a silver finished escutcheon. Two identical swords, complete with Herouard retailer mark and sheaths, are pictured on page 194 of “The Pinfire System” by Smith & Curtis.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Rock Island Auctions

Hand and a Half Sword with the coat of arms of the Holstein family of Reventlow

  • Dated: 1563
  • Culture: probably North German
  • Measurements: overall lenght 124.5 cm; handle lenght 22 cm; weight: approximately 1.6kg

The dated on the blade is referring to the The Northern Seven Years’ War between the Kingdom of Sweden and a coalition of Denmark–Norway, Lübeck and the Polish–Lithuanian union. The sword was part of a collection of weapons which was sold in Denmark, Gaunö, 1930.

The handle is composed of a wood grip with leather wrap and bell shaped pommel to act as a counter weight. The guard is simple set of straight quillons (22 cm wide) which has also a clam shell guard.

The blade is double edged with part of the reverse side holding an edge. The blade has a single fuller on either side and is inscribed with "NEC TEMERENEC TIMIDE AD 1563" and "INTER ARMA SILENT LEGE". Close to the guard you can also find several marking on either side of the blade and also the coat of arms on one side.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Antiques Armoury

Kindjal Dagger

  • Dating: circa 1800
  • Culture: Caucasian
  • Measurements: overall length 55 cm

The dagger has a wide, straight, double-edged blade with deep, asymmetrical grooves, featuring golden decorations for the first part of the blade. At the forte there’s cartouche with inscriptions. The dagger has the typical grip with wooden grip scales featuring gold-inlaid iron mounts.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Czerny’s International Auction House S.R.L.

Hunting Sword (Hanger)

  • Dated: circa 1630
  • Culture: British
  • Medium: steel, wood
  • Measurements: overall length 74 cm; blade length 63 cm; blade width 3.8 cm; hilt length 13 cm
  • Inscriptions: on the blade, obverse; inscribed: FERARA; reverse inscribed ANDRIA
  • Provenance: Gardner Sale, Sotheby’s 20/11/29, lot 20A

The pommel of the sword is made of steel and has the shape of an eagle’s head. The knuckle-guard curves outward at the top under the eagle’s beak and swells at midpoint to an oval cartouche crudely carved on each side as a human mask. The weapon has very short downcurled rear quillon, its terminal formed as an eagle’s head en suite with the pommel.

The large, sharply turned down shell-guard is carved on the outside ‘à jour’ with leaves and tendrils enclosing another mask, turned upward. Two of the tendrils end in grotesque heads are reminiscent of the ‘Babewyns’. The sword has a curved blade with a back-edge and a long narrow fuller against the back. On the obverse of the blade, lies an inscription, ‘FERARA’, and on the reverse ‘ANDRIA’.

Source: Copyright © 2014 The Fitzwilliam Museum, University of Cambridge, UK

[ NEWS ] Archaeologists say Anglo-Saxon sword discovery “couldn’t have been better scripted”
By Ben Miller 
X-rays will be carried out on an Anglo-Saxon sword found alongside beads, bodies and more in neolithic Wiltshire
Archaeologists have praised the timing and good fortune of a barrow dig on Salisbury Plain which has culminated in the discovery of 13 Anglo-Saxon graves, adding to around 62 already found at the site during previous excavations.
A surprising Anglo-Saxon burial, found in a crouched position, a range of weapons, including spearheads and shield bosses, and the fourth example of a brooch-bearing woman were among the highlights during five weeks of investigations at Barrow Clump, a Neolithic settlement which later became a Bronze Age burial mound and Saxon cemetery,
“The finding of the Anglo-Saxon sword, by Steve Winterton, couldn’t have been better scripted,” said Phil Andrews, of Wessex Archaeology, who admitted that this year’s excavations had exceeded his “relatively modest” expectations.
“Perhaps my most satisfying moment was the discovery of Lieutenant Colonel Hawley’s late 19th century excavation trench – something we had failed to find in previous seasons.
"Having a cherry-picker on site on Thursday gave us a chance to see the results of our work from above.
"The final burial was lifted on Friday and all recording completed. The last people left site on Saturday and by the end of Tuesday the excavation trenches had been backfilled and we said our farewells to Barrow Clump.
“It proved to be a very good year for beads, particularly glass, with a range of shapes, sizes and colours found with three of the female burials.
“Barrow Clump has always come up with pleasant surprises, and it is without doubt a site to remember for all the right reasons.”
Processing and post-excavation work will continue for the rest of the year, including x-rays of the sword.

Sources: Copyright © 2014 Culture 24 | Photo source © Wessex Archaeology

[ NEWS ] Archaeologists say Anglo-Saxon sword discovery “couldn’t have been better scripted”

  • By Ben Miller 
  • X-rays will be carried out on an Anglo-Saxon sword found alongside beads, bodies and more in neolithic Wiltshire

Archaeologists have praised the timing and good fortune of a barrow dig on Salisbury Plain which has culminated in the discovery of 13 Anglo-Saxon graves, adding to around 62 already found at the site during previous excavations.

A surprising Anglo-Saxon burial, found in a crouched position, a range of weapons, including spearheads and shield bosses, and the fourth example of a brooch-bearing woman were among the highlights during five weeks of investigations at Barrow Clump, a Neolithic settlement which later became a Bronze Age burial mound and Saxon cemetery,

“The finding of the Anglo-Saxon sword, by Steve Winterton, couldn’t have been better scripted,” said Phil Andrews, of Wessex Archaeology, who admitted that this year’s excavations had exceeded his “relatively modest” expectations.

“Perhaps my most satisfying moment was the discovery of Lieutenant Colonel Hawley’s late 19th century excavation trench – something we had failed to find in previous seasons.

"Having a cherry-picker on site on Thursday gave us a chance to see the results of our work from above.

"The final burial was lifted on Friday and all recording completed. The last people left site on Saturday and by the end of Tuesday the excavation trenches had been backfilled and we said our farewells to Barrow Clump.

“It proved to be a very good year for beads, particularly glass, with a range of shapes, sizes and colours found with three of the female burials.

“Barrow Clump has always come up with pleasant surprises, and it is without doubt a site to remember for all the right reasons.”

Processing and post-excavation work will continue for the rest of the year, including x-rays of the sword.

Sources: Copyright © 2014 Culture 24 | Photo source © Wessex Archaeology