Art of Swords

Sword
/sôrd/
Noun
1. A weapon consisting typically of a long, straight or slightly curved, pointed blade having one or two cutting edges and set into a hilt.
2. An instrument of death or destruction.

Short Sword

  • Dated: circa 1530 — 1540
  • Culture: South German or Swiss
  • Medium: steel, leather
  • Measurements: overall length,78.6 cm; grup length, 8.2 cm; blade length, 65.3 cm, quillons width, 18.6 cm; weight, 1.5 kg

The form of the guards of this sword is typically South German of the second quarter of the 16th century, but the pommel is as distinctively Venetian while its blade bears the mark of Basle. It seems that such marks stamped upon blades do not refer to its place of origin of the blade, but of the hilt in which it is mounted. Therefore it seems to be reasonable to assume that this sword is, basically, Swiss, though it has the appearance of a hybrid.

A particularly fine sword with a similar guard is in Rome, in the Odescalchi Collection, Mu. no. 185. This is illustrated in Nolfo di Carpegna’s catalogue of its collection, and in Boccia and Coelho’s ‘Nemi Bianche Italiane’, no. 381. A sword with an almost identical pommel and similar guards was sold by the Galerie Helbing in Madrid in 1908, from which sale some of the Medieval swords in the Fitzwilliam Collection came.

The pommel has the form of a crown of three fleusons, the middle on a long truncated cone accommodating the top of the long, which is switched over without a button. The sword features a half-basket guard of four elements of flat triangular section. The knuckle-guard is turned over at the top, the loop-guard covering the back of the hand, springing from the top of the knuckle-guard and meeting the midpoint of a forward ring-guard. Between these two guards is an S-shaped counter-guard. 

The sword has a straight quillons of the same flat triangular section as the guards. The quillons widens toward the tips, which are cut off straight and finished with small spherical knobs. The back-guard is made of one bar, springing from the root of the outside quillon and joining the end of a single short outside branch.

The grip is of oval section, widening toward the pommel, covered in red-brown leather. The broad back-edged blade, with a shallow fuller just inside the back edge which ends in a short cusp at the point. The back is very slightly curved. The blade bears its stamped mark of the City of Basle.

Source: Copyright © 2014 The Fitzwilliam Museum, University of Cambridge

Steel double-edged Sword

  • Dated: 16th - 18th century
  • Place of Origin: Zanzibar
  • Measurements: overall lenght 83.8 cm

Featuring a long blade, slightly tapering at the rounded point, the hilt of the sword comes with a dome-shaped pommel and down-turned quillons. The latter is pierced at each junction.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Bonhams

Dha Sword

  • Dated: early 19th Century
  • Culture: Burmese
  • Measurements: overall length: 72 cm (28-1/4 inches)

The sword has a wooden hilt covered with a silver-metaled plate that is entirely filigree, and a pommel with melon-shaped sides. It features a single edge, curved blade with round back and a wooden sheath covered with silver plate.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Expertissim

Dao Sword

  • Dated: early 20th Century
  • Culture: Chinese
  • Measurements: length 90.5 cm

The sword has a slightly curved, single-edged, damask blade, with a double groove, engraved with the effigy of a dragon on a face and ideograms on the other. It features a flat, brass hilt of lobed shape with relieved border, decorated with bas-relieved floral motifs en suite with all other mounts. The grip is black, made of wood while the wooden scabbard comes with mounts decorated en suite.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Czerny’s International Auction House S.R.L.

Katar Dagger

  • Dated: mid-17th century
  • Culture: Indian
  • Measurements: overall length 36 cm

Of characteristic form, the hilt of the dagger has chiseled grips terminating in acanthus leaves showing traces of silver. The base features curvilinear profiling, while the finely-forged blade comes with sinuous edge treatment. The blade also has a bright polished with armor-piercing tip and actively-patterned silver-gray Damascus steel visible in the triangular central panel and flanking pairs of triple fullers on either side.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Auction Flex

Piha Kaetta Dagger

  • Dated: 18th century
  • Place of Origin: Ceylon (Sri Lanka)
  • Measurements: overall length: 15 inches (380mm). Blade length: 13 inches (330mm)

This is a very elaborate and beautiful example with ivory grips that are intricately carved and fitted in silver. The grip strap is copper and equally as intricate. The upper part of blade appears to be gilt brass, with a central rosette surrounded by floral patterns. The dagger has a short, heavy, and stubby blade. The original wooden scabbard has a large copper throat piece wonderfully patinated, bordered by a silver band.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Akaal Arms

Serbian Nozh Dagger

  • Dated: first half of the 19th century
  • Measurements: overall length 32.5 cm

With fine, intricately filigreed silver hilt of cylindrical form, the dagger is set with multiple corals on each surface. It has a straight, single-edged blade with profiling and fuller along the spine, with long clipped tip struck with stars and crescents. In its embossed in its silver scabbard with bead finial

Source: Copyright © 2014 iCollector

Hand-and-a-Half Sword

  • Dated: circa 1475-1500
  • Culture: Italian
  • Medium: partially etched and gilded steel, copper alloy [blade]; iron, wood, velvet, cord [hilt]
  • Measurements: overall length: 46 3/4 inches (118.7 cm). Pommel: 3 1/4 × 1 1/8 × 3 3/4 inches (8.3 × 2.9 × 9.5 cm). Width (Quillons): 11 15/16 inches (30.4 cm). Depth (Quillon Block): 3/4 inches (1.9 cm). Blade: 2 11/16 × 37 1/16 inches (6.8 × 94.2 cm)

This is one of the finest knightly swords surviving from the late fifteenth century. Particularly outstanding are the mighty forms and harmonious proportions of its pommel and blade, the embellishment of the latter with delicate etched and gilt ornaments, and the overall condition of the entire sword, which retains its original velvet-covered grip.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Philadelphia Museum of Art

[ BOOK ] The Full Collection: Rare Historical Metalsmithing Books
[ BUY LINK ]
This complete collection includes 43 Rare Historical Metalsmithing Books in PDF format, and TWO entries in our random draw of Gift certificates from Rio Grande. 
VOLUME 1
A Manual of Electro-Metallurgy, By James Napier, 1860
American Watchmaker And Jeweler by Henry G. Abbott, 1896
An Introduction To Metalworking, By J. C. Pearson, 1904
Art Metal Work and Jewelry by Louis J. Haas, 1916
Brass Repousse for Amateurs by Gawthorp, 1902
College and Corpoorate plate, South Kensington Museum Art Handbooks, By Wilfred Joseph Cripps, 1881
Copper Work, By Augustus F. Rose, 1908
Decoration of Metals - Chasing, Repousse and Saw Piercing by John Harrison, 1894
Designs for Silversmiths, South Kensington Museum, 1871
Diamonds, Pearls and Precious Stones, by Marcell N. Smith, 1913 
VOLUME 2
Educational Metalcraft by P. Wylie Davidson, 1913
Electro-Plating (with numerous engravings and diagrams), Paul Hasluck, Editor, 1905
Enamels and Enamelling, By Paul Randeau (translated from German by Charles Salter), 1912
Gemstones and Their Distinctive Characters by G. F. Herbert Smith, 1912
General Letter Engraving for Watchmakers, Jewelers and Kindred Trades, by G. F. Whelpley, 1892
Gilding, Silvering and Bronzing, edited by Bernard E. Jones, 1918
Hall-Marking of Jewellery, Practically Considered, By George E. Gee, 1882
Handbook on Electroplating, Polishing, Lacquering, Burnishing, Enamelling. By W. Canning 1907
How to Enamel: Practical Enameling of Jewelry with Hard Enamels by Howard M. Chapin, 1911
How to Make Jewelry by George S. Overton, 1914 
VOLUME 3
Manual of Instruction in Hard Soldering, By Harvey Rowell, 1884
Metal-Work, Chasing and Repousse for Home Art Workers by Frank G Jackson, 1903
Mixed Metals or Metallic Alloys by Arthur H. Hiorns, 1912
Modern Letter Engraving in Theory and Practice, by Fred Holmes Rees, 1898
On The Theory and Practice of Art Enamelling Upon Metals, By Henry Cunynghame M.A, 1899
Practical Engraving on Metal, by G. A. Banner, 1899
Precious Stones: Considered in their Scientific and Artistic Relations by A. H. Church, 1899
Repousse Work for Amateurs by L. L. Haslope
Sheet-Metal Worker’s Guide, By W. J. E. Ceane, 1911
Silversmiths Handbook by George E. Gee, 1885
VOLUME 4
Simple Jewellery by R. LL. B. Rathbone, 1910
Soldering, Brazing and Welding edited by Bernard E. Jones, 1916
The Art of Enamelling on Metal by W. N. Brown, 1914
The Art of Enamelling Upon Metal by Alexander Fisher, 1905
The Art of Hard Soldering By Henry G. Abbott, 1895
The Jewellers Guide and Handy Reference Book by William Redman, 1883
The Jewelry Repairer’s Handbook by John Keplinger, 1902
The Polishing AND Plating of Metals by Herbert J. Hawkins, 1902
The Private Book of Useful Alloys and Memoranda for Goldsmiths, Jewellers by James Collins, 1871
Watchmakers’ and Jewelers’ Practical Receipt Book, 1892 
BONUS eBooks
Lost Wax Jewelry Making: The Build-up Technique - Complete Edition
A Modern Method of Creating Enameled Filigree Jewelry by Leon Hornstein - Complete eBook Edition
Doming Silver Beads, by Nancy Howland, 2008

Source: Copyright © 2014 The Ganoksin Project

[ BOOK ] The Full Collection: Rare Historical Metalsmithing Books

This complete collection includes 43 Rare Historical Metalsmithing Books in PDF format, and TWO entries in our random draw of Gift certificates from Rio Grande. 

VOLUME 1

  • A Manual of Electro-Metallurgy, By James Napier, 1860
  • American Watchmaker And Jeweler by Henry G. Abbott, 1896
  • An Introduction To Metalworking, By J. C. Pearson, 1904
  • Art Metal Work and Jewelry by Louis J. Haas, 1916
  • Brass Repousse for Amateurs by Gawthorp, 1902
  • College and Corpoorate plate, South Kensington Museum Art Handbooks, By Wilfred Joseph Cripps, 1881
  • Copper Work, By Augustus F. Rose, 1908
  • Decoration of Metals - Chasing, Repousse and Saw Piercing by John Harrison, 1894
  • Designs for Silversmiths, South Kensington Museum, 1871
  • Diamonds, Pearls and Precious Stones, by Marcell N. Smith, 1913 

VOLUME 2

  • Educational Metalcraft by P. Wylie Davidson, 1913
  • Electro-Plating (with numerous engravings and diagrams), Paul Hasluck, Editor, 1905
  • Enamels and Enamelling, By Paul Randeau (translated from German by Charles Salter), 1912
  • Gemstones and Their Distinctive Characters by G. F. Herbert Smith, 1912
  • General Letter Engraving for Watchmakers, Jewelers and Kindred Trades, by G. F. Whelpley, 1892
  • Gilding, Silvering and Bronzing, edited by Bernard E. Jones, 1918
  • Hall-Marking of Jewellery, Practically Considered, By George E. Gee, 1882
  • Handbook on Electroplating, Polishing, Lacquering, Burnishing, Enamelling. By W. Canning 1907
  • How to Enamel: Practical Enameling of Jewelry with Hard Enamels by Howard M. Chapin, 1911
  • How to Make Jewelry by George S. Overton, 1914 

VOLUME 3

  • Manual of Instruction in Hard Soldering, By Harvey Rowell, 1884
  • Metal-Work, Chasing and Repousse for Home Art Workers by Frank G Jackson, 1903
  • Mixed Metals or Metallic Alloys by Arthur H. Hiorns, 1912
  • Modern Letter Engraving in Theory and Practice, by Fred Holmes Rees, 1898
  • On The Theory and Practice of Art Enamelling Upon Metals, By Henry Cunynghame M.A, 1899
  • Practical Engraving on Metal, by G. A. Banner, 1899
  • Precious Stones: Considered in their Scientific and Artistic Relations by A. H. Church, 1899
  • Repousse Work for Amateurs by L. L. Haslope
  • Sheet-Metal Worker’s Guide, By W. J. E. Ceane, 1911
  • Silversmiths Handbook by George E. Gee, 1885

VOLUME 4

  • Simple Jewellery by R. LL. B. Rathbone, 1910
  • Soldering, Brazing and Welding edited by Bernard E. Jones, 1916
  • The Art of Enamelling on Metal by W. N. Brown, 1914
  • The Art of Enamelling Upon Metal by Alexander Fisher, 1905
  • The Art of Hard Soldering By Henry G. Abbott, 1895
  • The Jewellers Guide and Handy Reference Book by William Redman, 1883
  • The Jewelry Repairer’s Handbook by John Keplinger, 1902
  • The Polishing AND Plating of Metals by Herbert J. Hawkins, 1902
  • The Private Book of Useful Alloys and Memoranda for Goldsmiths, Jewellers by James Collins, 1871
  • Watchmakers’ and Jewelers’ Practical Receipt Book, 1892 

BONUS eBooks

  • Lost Wax Jewelry Making: The Build-up Technique - Complete Edition
  • A Modern Method of Creating Enameled Filigree Jewelry by Leon Hornstein - Complete eBook Edition
  • Doming Silver Beads, by Nancy Howland, 2008

Source: Copyright © 2014 The Ganoksin Project

The Forging of a Hunting Knife

… in Tosa, Japan. Meet master craftsman Hiro Komatsu. As a child having grown up next to a blacksmith shop he wanted to become one very badly. He apprenticed at the age of 16 under a master craftsman of forestry and hunting tools. He specializes in hunting knives.

The peeps behind “cellisization" were allowed to film him forging a 210mm "sword nata." The links to their guild site are linked in the video description. The video is in Japanese only for now on both the information and buying their products, but they are working to change that.

Source: cellisization on YouTube